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and support. and what we have discovered is that people that use a, what they get out of that is what we call the network of fact. we have jill in the center of the network and you can see on the upper side where you have a health care provider to put information into her fault about her health care. if you have heard daughter using the mobile application to update people on the go. you have the neighbor that tax the schedule to see when he is going shopping -- this is an illustration of a network of fact or network model of the good life. the neighbor says, always check on line to see what joe needs. the physician's assistant says it is easy to share the test results. the personal care worker says i've posted on the loose handrail and they handled it right away. her sister says, i am part of a team now, what a relief. out of this idea of the network of fact, one is that this is what joe wants. this is her key to a good life. her network is actually her gateway to a good life and her ability to stay home. and we will launch a touch screen interface for those that want to connect through video
mackeena in a game of tennis. the interesting thing about wii is we use this little remote. just by moving our arms, we can control movement on the screen. you will be watching up on the big screen as we play a game of tennis. are you ready? all right. we will select two players. that is me. does that look like me? it kind of those -- of does. does that look like mackenna? that is not by chance. you can make the person look like anything you want. they can even look like aliens. interesting. we are going to play some great tennis today. ok. one thing to tell you, there is a little bar on top of the television. it picks up the movement of our arms. we're going to face the television as we play. here we go. how many of you are cheering for me? how many of you are cheering for her? what is up with that? [laughter] that is it. you are going down. we're going to play a single game of wii tennis. are you ready? all right. here we go. we're going to get intense. [applause] >> eco dash 15. -- 0-15. [applause] 0-30. >> she is currently destroying me. i will make a comeback. [applause] >> 0-40. >> t
important things people could be talking about now. for all of us, technology is here and going to be here, and we all need it. thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. thank you. i am really pleased to be up here -- well, not really, but you're so pleased to be able to tell you about two things before lunch -- i am pleased to be able to tell you about two things before lunch. as you know, this is the middle of a process to train and teach more people how to use computers. we wanted to showcase a little bit of what folks are learning out there. first, we will show a video, and then wind up -- linda will explain about lunch. i know a few people have slipped over there, but i ask everyone to be quiet for a few minutes. there is plenty to go around. the video we're going to show right now -- i got a feeling this morning at 4:00 a.m. that tells you how dedicated people were to be able to produce it and have it here today. i wanted to thank paul grant, who has worked with the project with the family services agency senior community services employment program. you will see his g
to be completed. a lot of hard decisions and he stood with us. phil ginsburg, rec and park director. our dpw director mohammed, the last time i saw o & m mohammed he was pushing a wheelbarrow. our department heads have stood with us. jill, karen, besides them, gary, who was at the time capital planning manager for rec and park. mindy, lenu chen, the manager for the project. michael from planning, john from the city attorney's office. michelle and mary, michelle is with the library and mary is with the friends of the library and put on this event today. our commissioners, rec and park, planning, library, who have voted unanimously. some of them more than once for this project. our board of supervisors, who stood with us. the architects, marsha and a special thanks to erin who has done so much to help us on though this project. you know? that is the city side of this public-private partnership and i have to be fair in saying that this project has lasted through the term of two supervisors, two head librarians, three mayors, and four rec and park general managers. the heart of this project, t
than you are today. use this resource. work to improve yourself because you will have a happier life in the end. will see it on one of my morning walks or bike rides. thank you very much. >> my goodness, what a rich a day. we can all have hope and not be fearful about anything. we take that attitude that we can reverse things. haute not going to tell them what my next birthday is going to be. she was born in 1932. one woman looked up at me and says, dear? she found out it was ok. we can all have the ability to do whatever we want to do. when she is not wrapping -- rapping, she is the co-director on the center for elder abuse and neglect, the university of california, irvine. a program called the institute of aging to 2007, i am proud to serve on that board. from catholic university in washington, who is started with the first song. there is no excuse for elder abuse. >> i am very happy to be here to talk to you all a little bit about elder abuse. there is about 5 million people. ♪ a little louder. you want me to rap? ♪ i need some help. my brain elasticity is not too god. i -- go
and esther solar for giving us this beautiful space to meet in today. is esther here? i haven't seen her. we'll thank her later. they made this space available for us. good morning, my name is me linda hague for those of you who don't know me. i was appointed by president obama a little more than two years ago to be united states attorney and it is my incredible honor to represent the president, the obama administration here in the northern district of california. welcome to the stop bullying summit. i'm a federal prosecutor so it may seem odd that here we are talking about bullying and we asked all of you to be here and i want to explain the origin of that and why this happened. you people, everybody in this room, has been involved in this issue and is doing incredible work on this issue and we were so honored to be a part of it and to meet with all of you and to speak with you about it. the origin is that as the united states attorney, the administration wants me, wants all the united states attorneys, to go out into the community. it's actually a very different role for the unite
. finally, we also are using technology to join our private companies in hiring san franciscans. hopefully some of your kids, some of your grandkids as well, are going to enjoy some of these great jobs in san francisco, because the companies that are here, many of them have agreed to use the virtual hiring practice called hiresf.org and share the technology to hire online send franciscans. we're doing the right here in our great city. i have a chief innovation officer, jane, who is working in my office. he keeps a good connection for both me and them members of the board of supervisors to share in what are the technologies and what they're doing in san francisco and what the latest discoveries are that we can possibly use to help improve our city. finally, as someone you know, i celebrated my 60th birthday last week. [applause] and my staff gave me an ipad, and is looking at it -- i might have to go and join your classes to be able to appreciate all the applications that we have there. so do not be surprised if the guy next to you has a mustache. when i leave here this morning, i will be g
two but only one was used. >> (speaking spanish). >> this is one that was used north of the capital. >> (speaking spanish). >> in the cities of the country >> (speaking spanish). >> when he was a child he was able to see those instruments and on extension today. (drums). (applause) . >> this is a donkey's jaw. it could be a horse or a donkey. >> donkey's jaw. >> and it's played by spiking it and to make the rattle sound and also creates this. (applause). >> (speaking spanish) sorry. (speaking spanish). >> this is the kahita and it is created as the -- i don't know that word. how do you say that? the piggy bank. you know where the boxes and the churches collect money? yeah. this is the original he here. yeah. >> (speaking spanish) (laughing) (speaking spanish). >> this instrument is called c carete and with the right hand and the left hand and open and shuts in a rhythmic time. >> (speaking spanish). >> so this instrument is called sen sero but it's actually a cow bell. >> (moo). >> it was made out of material. >> (speaking spanish). >> but for the african and any instrument t
for those poor little whatevers that are difrplt than us, but we are all equal. the third one is working together and i think about the giants, we're all for the team, not all together not as if we are color blind and color doesn't exist but with our diversity. the fourth is with power and authority, the person who stands up and says this is what needs to happen, like a school principal who says we're not going to let kids go around the school saying that's okay, all these things are needed. >> i like that, that's great. something that really resonated with me that tom said, if you simply tolerate diversity you are aspiring to mediocrity. can you talk about the ambassadors, adults taking an active role to intervene when we witness bullying. >> all of us are humbled by the virus, how systemic it's become. how do you get your hands around that? for me it's top down and bottom up. we are authority figures and what we do for our children and that's care, but we need to empower them to become the leaders they are waiting to become. this notion of youth adult partnership is esoteric in its
beating the dough too much and smiled when we had an almost round 40 a. for us, it is a the best way to connect because they live very far away and we do not get to see the mother rise. it is an important way for all of us to be able to connect with our families and with our communities. for americans living with disabilities, many of whom are also aging americans, broadband and commuters -- computers can provide even more critical tools for health and wellness. they allow someone with a speech impairment to e-mail her doctor, a person who is mobility limited to its in glasses -- classes online, and for someone else to work at home. 29% of people with disabilities would join the work force if telecommuting were actually a viable option for them. before working at home, however, broadband is now a necessity for anyone searching for a job. many job openings are only posted online. about 80% of fortune 500 companies only accept job applications online. and about 60% of working americans use the internet as an integral part of their jobs every single day. if you do not have broadband, yo
in recent years. his colleague have actually stopped using the term of "bullying" and refer to peer aggression and i can go into definitions but i won't bore you. a subset of bullying is also not on the rise and based on researchers and their samples and other scholar's work and 20% of teens have ever experienced cyber bullying and a scholar from norway published lower numbers but why be such a stickler about accurate data? because the norms for research say getting the facts out takes the tacit acceptance or fatalism out of the picture. perception changes behavior so when we connect surveys in school and own their own data and a psychology professor at university of nebraska and the vast majority of students moment engage in bullying behavior and when students find that out bullying behavior goes down further and it's a powerful resource you can use. now i'm going to introduce this amazing panel. first we have just to my right mia from sealtion. she is going to explain more about this term that was used a lot today and social literacy or social emotional learning. alice con i
with this one, and the proper use of our library bonds program from beginning from the year 2000 with the great partnership of dpw and so forth. there are more great partnerships to be guilt because guess what we're doing with the bonds that publicly improves, we're honoring these kids' future. this is a place where there is going to be invent, sharing, yes, exploring, meeting, oh, gosh, what else did we miss? >> meeting. >> instructor: yes, meeting and sharing and exploring and inventing and reading. of course. we're just going to have so much of this and i'm so happy to be working with the supervisors who also know this. because we're working together on things that you believe in. and i'm waiting for the chance, when board president chiu and scott wiener have their kids and when they come to north beach branch library, they will remember this day, when they bring their kids up to the front and say mayor lee and luis herrera and everybody worked together to get this done. and, by the way, more is to come when we all work together. because today is about a confirmation, the biggest thanks g
noodles without breaking them. do you use fish cake? yes. really? really? i have been looking for it. but i cannot find any. oh, i got one. no wonder i could not find it. it's so thin. i can see through it to over there. that's okay. that's okay. sometimes other noodle shops use sponge cake instead. that's terrible. that's terrible. yes, this is real sponge cake. that's okay. that's okay. i'm not picky person okay. do i have to eat all? yuck. disgusting. [crying noises] i'm almost done. i gave up eating noodles. thank you. thank you how much is it. 16? i have small change can you give me your hand. yes of course. are you ready? [laughing] are you ready to get paid? what's so funny. one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight. what time is it now? five. six seven, eight, nine, ten, thank you. >> the story i would like to perform today is an old classical tail. very, very old story well-known in japan and original tielt s title in english is the samurai. hope you enjoy it. just sit back and relax and enjoy the story. about 300 years ago in the certain period there were inns or trad
all of us, or tries to make all of us better men, better people, better husbands, better friends. larry alluded to it the life lessons watching these guys perform everyday and we have a phrase for it "feeding the beast". this game is a rugged game and like life you need to put a lot into it and they became teammates and competed like nobody has seen. i am humbled to be part of this. i am so happy for all our family and friends and this is why we do this, and you folks will be etched in time and in history as one of the greatest teams not only in san francisco history but in baseball. [cheers and applause] . you earned it and you couldn't have done it without a hall of fame manager and like you guys great things happen to great people. that's what happened to this team. as good as baseball players they are and as big as their accomplishments are they're great people and to call bruce bochy my friend or colleague or mentor, or somebody that i cherish our relationship so much that i can't explain. the one thing that we have here that no other organization has is everybody is o
there is a bunch of broken pottery so you know this was a used route a thousand years ago. and the arch leads down into a canyon that opens up and you go up a side canyon into this little alcove where a piece of the ceiling has fallen just slightly. and i found this place. the first time i found this was on the 27th day of a back pack and i got up to this spot and i took my hat off and i stuck my head in the crack, which is something that i do frequently out there, because i know every once in a while you're going it see something back inside one of these cracks. and back in this crack there was a basket about 1500 years old that had been turned upside down so it wouldn't collect anything and it was way back down in the crack so that no light or wind would touch it. and it was in perfect condition. you could put it on your kitchen table. you could put apples in it. and as far as i know, it's still there except for that piece which we went on this trip to collect a piece for radio carbon dating, a federal archeologist in southern utah had asked us to pick up one piece of it to bring out. so that pa
. >> (speaking spanish). >> and the form of communication and many of the movements were -- they were used in the dances that we have today. >> (speaking spanish). >> this movement -- >> span spanish. >> are >> >> (speaking spanish). >> are here and it means soul. >> (speaking spanish). >> and when we go to move our bodies -- >> (speaking spanish). >> they mean the essence. >> (speaking spanish). >> when they go to work the earth -- >> (speaking spanish). >> is the contact with our mother nature. >>nature -- >> (speaking spanish). >> that will live us food, take care of us and receive us before we die. >> (speaking spanish). >> we also have this and movement of work. >> (speaking spanish). >> or conversation. >> (speaking spanish). >> which is the key to receive love. >> (speaking spanish). >> and all these type of movements were followed by this style of dance with its own co n coring on gravy. >> >> (speaking spanish) (music). (applause). >> can you play the music please? >> i want to dance with everybody. >> well, he's not there. (music). >> okay do you have any questions? we need to
cities and teams. are you ready? they were supposed to be better than us after a bunch of trades. the los angeles dodgers are -- all right. the giants. they're down to two games of cincinnati. they win three straight. the reds are? >> audience: out of here! >> it has to be louder for the next two. are you ready? the giants go to st. louis and need to win there and back home. the st. louis cardinals are? >> audience: out of here! >> now for the big one. the mighty american league detroit tigers. you ready? the detroit tigers -- they are? audience: out of here! >> you never disappoint. here is my partner mike. >> well, we have become an organization of expertation. there's expectation when you win a championship in 2010 and there is expectation when you get in that ballpark everyday and it's over flowing with your love and affection and there is purity in the formula that this organization goes about trying to meet those standards of excellence. it starts with the fans of historians that we call investors that kept us here in san francisco and goes to the front office
about a culture or a community, that's what they are used to. you tell people not to do that but as a child all you've heard is negativity and you've been beat up on and they talk bad to you. it's not just from one workshop you are going to change the mindset, how do we understand the mentality. the other is understanding the online/offline. we had alonzo coming in and speaking to us, they don't understand the impact, it's not enough for me to say we're going to do a workshop or a campaign, a poster thing, it's really about how do we change the culture of a community and a people and it's not just a one-off. >> what does it take? >> the thing about changing the environment again, changing the social norms, it helps to understand there are primarily about 5 different ways we can influence and warm the climate of a school or community, students being one, families and parents, staff, policies and young people themselves. if we can understand that strategickly, sort of get down out of the big conversation and look at ways how do we, as you said, educate the educators, mak
rat that with a discipline situation and i try to use the teachable moment with the parents as well so you can move forward all together instead of just making everybody upset. >> i have some comments actually responding to what you asked about, the zero tolerance and different proposallity. one of my colleague and looked at this across the last 15 years and noticed a trend what we called "net widening and net deepening" and more behaviors that fall under expulsion and suspending and when talking to administrators and their policies he found it helpful to speak of these terms in termses of behaviors and rather than saying we're criminalizing you and the think language is also important and i want to thank you for bringing up that point. it's something that i really advocate for and our caution to use zero tolerance and exclusionary discipline policies and also i teach teachers at san jose state and hundred students who are future teachers. >> can they do a projector? >> no. my teacher did, but again using social media, integrating all of the areas is so important for the prevention.
love you provided us selling out all 89 home games and all the wonderful fanses, and i see some of you that traveled withed team, road warriors to make road games feel like home games. you inspired us. we know you filled this plaza on sunday when we were in detroit. we know you cheer friday your couches at home, from your neighborhood street parties and then throughout october with the city we lit up the city. it was a washid orange from coit tower to the ferry building to right here at city hall. what can we take away from our 2012 giants? i believe we can take away life lessons. vuch teachable moments for our children and our team did face challenges and whether facing injuries or newly acquired players or facing elimination game one after another. what were the life lessons? never give up no matter how high the mountain is to climb. have integrity and conduct yourself with professionalism. did this team do that? absolutely. play with a team with unselfish devotion. trust one another and love your team teammates and in always do so have fun and it's meant to be played a
english or at all initially there were only about 5% of us that were hispanic in the school and wouldn't be the case if 95% are hispanic and english speaking as a second language, but i think the way that we can deal with the issue is we ought to first of all start with the notion of respect for others, and respect for others can work across the line. it doesn't necessarily mean -- it doesn'tly has to deal with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable behavior, and i am often fearful when we try to develop a black letter law if you have all these factors and bullying and you fell outside and that works okay in the courtroom. right? as prosecutors we need clear understanding of the laws to understand whether we have a criminal violation or not, but i am fearful we maybe overly legalistic and the way we deal with on a daily basis and we need to approach this by a global perspective respecting people and understanding we have the
content to us that is inappropriate, but we have since invested a lot of time and energy on things like social resolutions. how do you create a culture where people can report problems to each other? which i will talk about in a second, so cue up the next slide. >> dave, can i interrupt for a second? one of the things that i noticed they think is really important for people in the school space and probably law enforcement to remember is that social media platforms whatever it is and you name it -- what? a million apps for the mobile platform alone. those are not the context of bullying. school life, school, peer life, peer relations. that's the concept of bullying whether it's bullying or cyber bullying and this blame the new thing that's come along because we don't fully understand it because we kind of don't like it, or it's a waste of time for kids and all of those things are understandable and we blame what we don't understand, but kids love the media and it's time to start the understanding and understanding that these media are totally blended into their lives. it's not an a
away? >> i'm actually going to use an example that might seem a little far-flung for that question. one of the things i wanted to talk about with colleagues is the write up process when they cuss you out in the classroom or the hallway. i was in chicago in may and already the strike talk was coming up and talking to some of the teacher. one of the teachers said i don't know what to do about this bullying thing because the kids are cussing me out in the hallway and all i can do is write them up. i think that's a moment i'd like us to think about in terms of empowerment of the teacher. it might be the case that the teacher doesn't feel for a lot of different reasons that she can't depend on his principal to back her up and maybe that principal their best, too. but one of the things i want us it look at in terms of treating children with dignity, which means they are worthy, two things. respect as a word is overused in schools and if i could frankly take down all of the banners of in schools that say you have to respect yourselves, i would. because i think that kids see that and
used to call it in servicing, a lot of people think you wouldn't want to go to an in service. teachers are always hungry for stuff. i believe in the law enforcement community and the other convenient tues we're talking about, they are already there. they got the itch. with some leadership from the community or a faith organization or a parent i think it will actualize. >> the sunnyvale safety and police department have been really spectacular and have spearheaded this with officer holly lawrence. she has the program, it's in place, we call it train the trainer where we train other police officers to take it back to their counties. it's a spectacular program and is available now. >> so we don't have to wait. >> a good thing about the digital age is we're going to take some of the best practices, we're going to make it available. you get school officials to think how does this fit into the queue of things i did and should be doing, tlau our web site, focus of expertise and other places, indicate what are those programs that work that help students understand the issue, help the adults
in a classroom? you start from a letter that a vikings punter sent. that's where we also get into u.s. history and this is where we get into core rur can urriculum. this is about freedom of speech, it makes it relevant, it goes right into something that kids are already seen on espn so they are already primed to talk about it. that's the kind of stuff i think we need to be looking at so we get this bullying stuff out of their head and they see relevance instead. >> anyone want to take some questions? i want to start with a young student. >> everyone needs to read that letter. it is shocking. >> alexis, are you here? you want to come up here? come on. don't be shy, nobody's going to bite. >> let's give her some encouragement here. we've heard from adults all day long, we want to hear from somebody who is -- come over here, young lady. my name is cheryl, thank you for being here. we have some great guests who care about you, everybody in this room cares about you. you have been through some training. you have a question for our guests? >> no, but i want to thank you for doing this. t
know is a comical one man story telling that uses very limited stage set and instruments and thus it's a japanese tradition performing arts that requires special and traditional and highly trained skills. >> today's story. the hunter. 300 decadesing an in japan there was a man who liked hunting. he told a lie to a bird. or a small light. small harrons make good friends or not. you might find the answer in my story. >> good afternoon. what are you up to these days anything exciting? yes, i have an idea. >> are you going to be the hunter in >> you told on me you're going to be unicorn hunter. it's a kind of snake kind of hunt er japan. you ever seen them. it was a stupid idea. just the one. the japanese proverb says. my prompt cart. please listen. okay. go ahead. i go to where many harrons come to feed. i walled out to one of him in a loud voice like this. [yelling] hello mr. onin. what will the herring think? well i wonder what he wants. i understand he wants to capture me. well, what should i do. no. i can get away easy any time but i think silly man. i don't know this him and so
of us. that can really help and donate at red cross .org and we thank you for your generosity. it was just two years ago that we captured the championship since moving to san francisco and i think we're happy we didn't have to wait until 52 years. [cheers and applause] we've got another trophy in this great city by the bay. [cheers and applause] so today giants fans once again you are all world champions and together we are giants, so we have a wonderful program planned for you today and i know you're anxious to get this started started and bring the guys out and celebrate your 2012 san francisco giants so let's get started. first of all we are joined by a number of special dignitaries who have helped to make san francisco one of the best baseball towns -- no, the best baseball town in america. [cheers and applause] let us now welcome and please show your love and enthusiasm the mayor of city and county of san francisco the honorable edwin lee. former mayor and current lieutenant governor the honorable gavin newsom. the city chief of protocol charlotte schultz, and her hus
the heart of al gubungi. have you made small steps into the desert within us or listened for the gutterals longed deep within our throats, you would have come bearing gifts. i have nothing in red that i would not abide in green. el batanabi wrote the heart of our silken tanab, what need have we for you? no poem has ever enough red but that its blood might river beneath the veins of its people. beneath the desert sun, one man by one man by one man breathes six. thousands of tons wrung sonorous from the sky. where is god? black-eyed woman, the street dogs are running wild. will you save me? simple white ignorance, even the desert has gone into hiding. there is no more meaning here than the crested moon holds towards a dying grove of date trees. i am for the arabic, for the transcription of the arabic, zato dates over fire-baked bread. the twin rivers have already called for us a history. our poets have already explained to us the desert. by what right have you come? who have you have seen the rustic crane in the tree, no chimes but for its delicate wide beak, ushers an intemperate reprieve?
's victims. that is painting with a very broad brush, but it's something that encourages us to take action. i think in my prosecutors office there is hard and soft power. the hard power in a prosecutor's office, in a police department, it's arresting. it's putting in jail. it's going in court and find this person guilty and punish them. that's a kind of hard power and most of what is done in a prosecutor's office -- most of the resources are devoted to those hard power tasks, but although we devote less resources to soft power there are probably more important and soft power is where you change the hearts and minds of people. where you try to change cultures, try to change the norms in the community are and certainly in our office we devote significant resources to this. just a couple of examples. we have something called the parent project, and i am very grateful in a time of really reduced funding our board of supervisors stepped up and provided funding for otherwise what was run on a shoe string out of our office, and it's a program that teaches parents to be better parents and pa
's not how any of us can afford to approach their jobs. i don't want to prosecute any more hate crimes cases. i want to be, for those of you over 50, remember that maytag commercial, the guy is sitting there waiting for that phone to ring? i want to be that room. i want to have nothing to do. i want to take my niece up on her offer to golf at the present side owe because i want to have time on my hands. but we see this headwind of intolerance that is a growth industry, i real estate gret to tell you. we see it manifested in our hate crimes practice, so many cases involving teenagers who have been recruited at a young age to desecrate mosques, to do so many other unspeakable things in communities across this country. so we have to get to work and we are, in fact, getting to work and i am so impressed at the partnerships that have been out here. i'm so impressed that we recognize that bullying is no longer simply the bullying of your fists but it's the bullying that can come through the use of twitter, through the use of other social media. we did a case, again a hate crimes case involvin
to creating a safe, thriving and respectful environment. when rooster tail restaurant informed us that they were proposing to expand and have an outdoor dining room patio, we became very concerned. since there were noise and pre-existing pests and rodent issues in the area. residents had valid concerns about noise, sanitation, and cleanliness. our four-block area is made up of three-fourth residences and one-fourth businesses. because we felt our concerns were not being adequately addressed a petition was started. people who lived on sutter, webster post and fillmore signed an opposition and collect $5 5 signatures. we appreciate rooster tail restaurants support of our concerns, putting up signage, and to hose and clean the outdoor patio nightly and maintain cleanliness. since this past monday i have been informing all the petition signees of these recent changes and inquiring whether they agree to these changes or wish to continue opposing. as of today, 26 signees have responded, but there has not been a consensus since some are still opposed. our actions have always been motivat
, so i knew that that wasn't good. >> and that was our nightmare. >> a parent came to us, we'd known her personally, the whole family, for a long time. and she told me, she asked -- i thank her for the courage it took to come forward. she said, i don't know how to tell you this, but i think there's so much going on. >> she told us her son had come to her and told her there was a picture jill had sent to him in december naked in her body and it had been passed to another boy and then to another boy and put up on the internet. >> he told me he had these pictures of jill and he was telling everybody that they were on his email account. so everybody went on the email account and they saw and they sent them to themselves just to have them just to, i don't know, just to --. >> we were very surprised when she told us about the picture. we had no idea. jill was very private, we couldn't understand why she would send something like that to a boy that she wasn't a boyfriend, it was just a friend. >> our first thought, this isn't true. we first thought this can't be true. then i thought
as being much older. >> in the course of writing the play and using various actors, he became younger. this chinese actor is more like a character in his mid to late 30's, excentric, a career bachelor who is into russian literature and who fashions himself kind of patterned after the japanese artists of the 30's and 40's. he has round sort of glasses and a braid. but getting back to the question of creating characters, for example african american characters, i'm also caution -- i had written another play called johann that was about an african american gi and a japanese wife that got married in post war japan. i wrote that play 20 years ago. i wouldn't do it for about 8 years or so because i just didn't feel comfortable about being a japanese american writing an african american character. you have to think about, too, this whole idea of political correctness has both an up side and a very bad down side. one of those is people tend to be very cautious and not want to try things like that. i eventually through my relationship with danny glover pulled it out of my drawers -- out of the
of language, which is poetry for me. it made me aware of how to use language. not to over use language. you know things like that that aspects of it. i talk a lot about the writing process for a lot of reasons because i think that if you tell what it really means to be a writer people will think oh , it's not -- i think to a large extent you all think we run with the bulls. you know and you think we are sitting in cafes and i can never write in a cafe because i would watch people too much. how can you sit in a cafe and write a novel? we all have our process. i think the interesting things to talk about is the process how you do it because we all do it differently. i don't run with the bulls or sit in cafes. this is the way i do it. there are many ways to do it and you have to find your own way. >> around the web i googled through me to see what it looked like i saw the big bridge and it looked industrialized. >> there really is love. >> i did. a real place and how you pick the location. i have family in japan and my kids are are in a bilingual program in san francisco that's japanese. >>
, an effort to use good data in research, they have released a come pend yum of common bullying tools. that's also available online. we are doing these conversations with community and the president has convened now two bullying summits where we bring the best practices to bear and learn locally. we've been doing webinar series across the country, you can find the dates for those on the web site. tom also mentioned about school busses and we realize, right, because this is not just about teachers, this is not just about forward-looking superintendents or guidance councilors or mental health professionals in schools, i don't need to tell anyone in this room about what's been happening on school busses. we are in partnership with the nea and companies helping train bus drivers so they know what to do better. you've seen the ad council campaign on bullying, it's really about the civic will to deal with this, encouraging conversations at home, that kind of social campaign is important to do that, and to encourage young people not to stand by in silence. so much of this, if you are not the per
and applause] now, another thing that occurred to us was that giants winning on the road the way they did, the one thing the giants' players really missed was that ability to share it with all of you, and we thought because they're right in the back here we could give them that feeling that if they had won it right here at at&t park. it's the last inning and sergio romo needs one more strike to win the series and dave at microphone. >> ready. cabrel the hitter. here is the two-two pitch. strike three called and the giants win the world series. [cheers and applause] we missed that cheer. pretty cool. >> good work. all right so let's meet them. first of all the coaches of the san francisco giants. tim flan ree. >> ron roatus. >> the hitting instructor and royalty from cure sal. >> giants first base coach roberto kelly. >> the great pitching coach of the best pitching staff on the planet, dave righetti. >> and saibian likes to call him pitching coach number two, mark gardener. >> coach and the catching instructor bill hayes. >> and giants hitting instructor joe lefebvre. >> there are o
. their voices leading us on. as the water lapped around me i saw a man the father of a school friend walk straight into the ocean he never turned back. one moment he was there and in the next he was swaulode by the sea. one woman took a knife and slashed her wrists. i remember how the bloodstreamed down her arms. she turned toward me with a strange smile handed me her knife. it felt so light. i looked down and saw it covered with the woman's blood. i wanted to scream and saw i lost my voice. don't be frightened, the old woman said, find the knife and end your misery return honor to your family. i know i didn't have the courage of the woman dying before me. when she reached toward me i pushed her back and she fell to our knees crying out for me to end her life as the waves washed over her. i began running. i ran and ran away from the beach and all the death and dying. now i don't remember what i was thinking. the greatest honor i could have given my family was that was my death and i ran from it. i was frightened for not fulfilling my obligation yet there was a voice in me that told me to
, theater commentator for klaw. chloe worked for several years in u.s. and uk theater companies and is the recipient of the allen wright award for arts journalism, the sundance institute arts fellowship and the nea fellowship of journalism. in 2006, she received a best columnist nomination at the annual san francisco media excellence awards and her first book on acting was published by farber and farber in the uk and farber, inc., in the united states. let's welcome phillip and chloe >> hi there, phillip. >> hi, chloe >> so, this play, it's been quite a journey. we're talking 3 1/2 years, maybe nearly 50 different drafts and 5 workshops? . >> five workshops, yes. >> so, looking back at the journey, how has it been for you and has it come out as you expected it would? . >> what's interesting is if you work on a play this long, normally there are times that it becomes redundant and you get a little bored with the piece. it's only natural. it's pushing 4 years now. this one was interesting in that it never got boring or ever felt redundant and each thing that we did over these almo
down on us for days and you would be working down with trowels inside of a trench and if you stop for too long, the sand would start to fill up your hole again because it was blowing so much and everybody was turned away from the wind. so it looked like some kind of religious thing was going on here, all these people bowed to the ground for days and days tinkering with some unimaginable smallness in front of them while the wind just pushed harder and harder, sand blasting across you, filling up all the rooms that you just emptied out as if the desert is rolling back over itself. because even where trails are left, trails disappear out there. nothing stays for too long, even the footprints that last for 7 years eventually disappear. i found something out there that i'd like to read to you. it was a site, an archeological site on the colorado plateau, that i ran into a number of years ago. and i've gone down to it a couple of times now. when i first found it, i had been on the river for 7 days in a canoe. and i tied off and broke through the tamarisk which if you've ever been down o
of the silk until i wanted to write something telling their story much the second book is the test book for us writers you hear that a lot where the publishers are wondering if the author has a second book. everybody here i feel sitting here all of you have one book in you. whether it's a family story or your story whether it's ancestors whether it's your history you want to write about. but it's the second one that's hard. i felt that when i turnod the computer and thought, now i have to write book number 2. i had in mind that i wanted to write something very different from women of the silk that was strictly about the feminist chinese women during the turn of the century and i wanted to write about my japanese culter. i didn't have the story or the culture unfortunately because i was born in san francisco, half chinese and half japanese but raised in the chinese culture. when it was time to write the second book and i knew i wanted to explore my japanese side it was going to be difficult in the way that i didn't know the culture. right away i had to learn a lot. it was something that was not
and residents facilities to encourage older adults to get more involved with physical activity using technology. we're going to spend the first 30 minutes or so demonstrating the wii. not only will we demonstrate how to use it, but we will doe demonstrate adaptive devices so demonstrate adaptive devices so that it can be an inclusive
(applause). >> [applause]. we have a very special guest. [inaudible] is here with us tonight. [inaudible] dancing. step dancing which we are familiar with. you may have seen this before. this will be a treat. [applause]. >> someone once told me this was from scandanavia. this is a different version. about 2 sisters that fall in love with the same guy. it didn't work out too well. one of the sisters throws another one into the raging water. he fashions her body into a fiddle, into a violin. this is the actual violin. i love her so much. [singing] [music playing] [applause] [music playing]
]. >> [applause]. >> [applause]. >> san francisco mayor lee is here to join us. this is especially special for us. about 14 months ago when we kicked off our first program lee was here. he helped cut the ribbon and launch with our first companies about 14 months ago, and i one thing i will say before you get up we thought long and hard where we wanted green star located and we knew we wanted it in silicon valley and we wanted to know where they were going to and we believe san francisco is on the way to being the heart and hub of silicon valley and where the heart and the leadership is and we will exciting where it's going and please welcome mayor ed lee. >> thank you mitch. thank you so much. you know innovation is infectious. it's as infectious as giants fever. how about that? so let me tell you i have been excited ever since i came here and cut the ribbon with mitch a year ago and want to the get back here and see how everything was progressing and guess what? just over a year and a half ago when we first started here and when i started as mayor san francisco unemployment rate was 9.6%
believed in us. thank you. [cheers and applause] >> [inaudible] played with all heart. all right. all right everyone. everyone's been talking about the speech and a lot about the reverend which is a lot of empty smoke if you ask me. there is one simple thing that happened with this team that hasn't been talked about enough and it was sacrifice. when i went up and talked to these guys i asked them to sacrifice themselves and play for each other and you won't see that too often with this big of a stage and the playoffs with this great group of super stars. they sacrificed their ego and they played for you guys and this is what this celebration is about. it's about you. thank you guys. we are going to bring this together. we want you to join in what we do in the dug out. i want you teach you about this and this is how we did it and i want you to lose your mind. >> ladies and gentlemen, this is how we get pumped up before we kill every team baby. >> every join with me. hands in the hair. we going to slow clap this and bring it up. (clapping). [cheers and applause] >> show t
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